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Suffering


Our Stories of Suffering and the Presence of God

K.J. Ramsey on Life and Grace in the Middle Places

The Making of a Saint: The Music of Good Saint Nathanael 

Hide No Truth, A Broken Heart, and Hope that Heals

Our Souls House Many Homes

Landscape, Memory, and Ignatian Imagination

How Depression Prepared Me for the Coronavirus or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Uncertainty

A Sequestering of the Mind and a World with Him and All the Saints

When Your Worst Day Is Preparation Day (Mark 15:43-47)

Morning Devotional from An Easy Stroll Through a Short Gospel: Meditations on Mark

Casket Clarity: The Muse in a Time of Chaos

When Music Delivers Truth

The Light Changes (Everything)

Or, Panic! at the LEGO

More than Lament: the Strange Boldness of Christianity

Seeing Beyond the Grave in a Pandemic

When Jesus Got Infected

Exilic Life in the Abyss, and a Savior who Refuses to Social Distance

The Hardest Moments Right Now

Tired, Sad, and Fed Up: In Other Words, the Everyday Struggles of Quarantine

Daniel Defoe on Preaching During a Pandemic

A resonant passage from A Journal of the Plague Year 1665, in which the author of Robinson Crusoe describes some of the preaching in London during that catastrophe, ht WDR:

Neither can I acquit those ministers that in their sermons rather sank than lifted up the hearts of their hearers. Many of them no doubt did it for the strengthening the resolution of the people, and especially for quickening them to repentance, but it certainly answered not their end, at least not in proportion to the injury it did another way; and indeed, as God Himself through the whole Scriptures rather draws to Him by invitations and calls to turn to Him and live, than drives us by terror and amazement, so I must confess I thought the ministers should have done also, imitating our blessed Lord and Master in this, that His whole Gospel is full of declarations from heaven of God’s mercy, and His readiness to receive penitents and forgive them, complaining, ‘Ye will not come unto Me that ye may have life’, and that therefore His Gospel is called the Gospel of Peace and the Gospel of Grace.

But we had some good men, and that of all persuasions and opinions, whose discourses were full of terror, who spoke nothing but dismal things; and as they brought the people together with a kind of horror, sent them away in tears, prophesying nothing but evil tidings, terrifying the people with the apprehensions of being utterly destroyed, not guiding them, at least not enough, to cry to heaven for mercy.

The Book of Sarah: On Eczema and Existential Despair

When God Doesn’t Explain Our Suffering