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Posts tagged "Islam"


PZ’s Podcast: Is Paris Burning? (1966)

EPISODE 207

Here are a few thoughts concerning the atrocity attacks in Paris. I talk about Islam (and “Islamophobia”), Syrian migration into Europe, Original Sin and “low” vs. “high” anthropology, reaction-formations among young men when drones are over their heads and they have no control, let alone “buy-in”; and finally, a threatening experience Mary and I had on Times Square recently. Call this PZ’s perspective on a current (big) event.

The 21 Beheaded Egyptians Make Me Proud to Be a Christian

From Cairo to Rome and beyond, the reaction to the beheading of 21 Coptic Christians by ISIS has been swift and profound: anger and condemnation, sadness and solidarity. Yet, as I have thought over this horrific event, another emotion has swelled within in me: pride. For while the Islamic State considers itself to be following in the footsteps […]

Another Week Ends: Liturgical Boredom, Hikikomori, Paul Deen, Doubtful Faith, Upstream Color, and Big Star

1. A slightly truncated weekender for a slightly truncated week. First off, The Guardian’s newfound boldness paid off–in spades!–in the non-Snowden-related form of Giles Fraser’s “Our Fear of Boredom Is Simply a Fear of Coming Face to Face With Ourselves”. As the title indicates, it’s a terrifically wise take on what’s really going on in […]

Norway and the Gospel: A Christian Response to World War IV

It has been a very intense week in the news, to say the least. While Obama and Boehner battle it out for the soul of the United States in the latest round of the American “culture wars,” the Norwegian tragedy draws our attention to what is truly the next great global conflict, what some are […]

Another Week (Almost) Ends: How We Decide, Islamic Search Engines, MJ, 9, Mountain Goats and Lions

1. A fascinating review of How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer over at Boing Boing (ht Jeff Dean). The book appears to be ar neuroscience-for-dummies study of the decision-making process, aka another volley in the post-free-will debate, this time claiming that decision-making is neither wholly rational or wholly emotional, but a mix of both. What […]