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About Nick Lannon

Nick is a 2000 graduate of the University of Arizona and a 2007 graduate of Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry, having studied Communications and Religious Studies while at Arizona and Systematic Theology and Ethics at Trinity. An avid movie-watcher, NBA fan and all-around couch potato (when he's not playing basketball or softball), Nick is fascinated by the intersection of the Gospel and everyday life. Ordained in 2007, Nick has pastored Episcopal churches in Jersey City (NJ), Denville (NJ), and Louisville (KY). He has served as Editor-in-chief and Director of Content, Research, and Writing at LIBERATE, the former resource ministry of Tullian Tchividjian, with whom he co-authored "It is Finished: 365 Days of Good News." Nick currently serves as Associate Rector of St. Francis in the Fields Episcopal Church in Louisville, Kentucky. Nick grew up in northern Virginia and lived there until going to Arizona in 1996, harboring naïve fantasies about playing on the basketball team. He currently lives in Louisville, Kentucky with his wife Aya and three children, Hazel, Patrick, and Charlie.

http://www.nicklannon.com

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Author Archive
    
    Geno Auriemma and the Tyranny of…Wait, Didn’t We Just Do This?

    Geno Auriemma and the Tyranny of…Wait, Didn’t We Just Do This?

    Geno Auriemma is the high priest of women’s college basketball. His career record is 1027-136, which, I promise you, is not a typo. I checked it a bunch of times. His University of Connecticut basketball team is the unquestioned top dog (it’s a pun…they’re the Huskies) in the sport. They get all best recruits, lose an average of about one game a season, and nearly always win the National Championship.

    But Auriemma’s not satisfied. He has no peace.

    Sports seems to provide the perfect crucible for this sort of impossible-to-satisfy quest. Tom Brady’s on it, and so is almost every other athlete,…

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    Tom, Time, and the Tyranny of Perfection

    Tom, Time, and the Tyranny of Perfection

    I’m finally ready for Tom Brady again. Are you? We watched as he was doubted at points during the second-to-most-recent NFL season—during which he was thirty-nine years old—only to come back and win the Super Bowl. We watched as he was lauded last season—at forty—only to lose the Super Bowl. We’ve listened to sports talk radio wonder how long he can play, how long he can be good, how long, how long, how long. I needed a break. How long, Oh Lord (Psalm 40), must we listen to stories about Tom Brady?

    It’s March, and I guess I’m ready again. The…

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    Done and Never Done

    Done and Never Done

    This NBA season has seen a spike in contentious behavior and talk between players and referees. Technical fouls are up, ejections are up, but most obviously, criticism is up. Referees aren’t available to the media, so we don’t have public instances of them criticizing players, but players are contractually obligated to talk to the media, so we have plenty of examples of them complaining about the refs. I guess that’s how the transaction works: a frustrated player complains after a frustrated official calls a technical foul. Which came first, the complaint or the technical? In a sense, this is nothing…

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    Chris Mazdzer, Passive Righteousness, and the Fastest Sport on Ice

    Chris Mazdzer, Passive Righteousness, and the Fastest Sport on Ice

    The other day, Chris Mazdzer did something no American has ever done: medal in the Olympic luge. You know the luge, it’s the one where the seemingly rubber-suited guys lie on their back on a sled and hurtle down the bobsled track at 80 miles an hour, sneaking an occasional peak to see where in God’s name they’re going and on which upcoming turn they might die. It’s a sport dominated by Eastern Europeans, because we Americans have apparently decided we have better things to do, like explaining, during literally every single routine, the excruciatingly simple colored dots scoring system…

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    Death, Taxes, and the New England Patriots

    Death, Taxes, and the New England Patriots

    I’m a Pittsburgh Steelers fan. In the main, the Steelers are a pretty great team for whom to root. They’re almost always pretty good, and win their division most years. Their ownership is stable, evidenced by the fact that they’ve had three coaches since 1969. For comparison’s sake, the Cleveland Browns—a nominal rival of the Steelers—have had eighteen coaches in that same period. The Browns are terrible. One of my favorite statistics is that, since he entered the league, Ben Roethlisberger, the Steelers’ veteran quarterback, is the winningest quarterback at the Browns’ stadium…and he plays there once per season. The…

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    UCF Tries to Make Themselves...Just Like Me

    UCF Tries to Make Themselves…Just Like Me

    Are you excited for the Georgia/Alabama game on Monday? The one that will crown the 2018 National Champi…oh, wait. Apparently the University of Central Florida already claimed the 2018 National Championship after their Peach Bowl victory over Auburn (admittedly, the only team who beat both Georgia and Alabama this season). What are we to make of this? In one sense, it’s almost honorable: the school is celebrating a group of students who accomplished something remarkable and is even paying its coaches the national championship bonuses called for in their contracts. There is even precedent for this behavior: calling yourself a…

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    No, Actually, I Don't Work Out: Good News for Unwilling Hearts (A DC Conference Preview)

    No, Actually, I Don’t Work Out: Good News for Unwilling Hearts (A DC Conference Preview)

    I don’t have any acquired tastes. I don’t drink coffee, or smoke a pipe, or do anything else that I didn’t like the first time. And no, actually, I don’t work out, either. I used to think that I was just weak…but now I’ve realized that while I am weak, I’m not just weak. I am also human.

    Thomas Cranmer, the English Reformer and first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury, knew a lot about this connection between weakness and humanity. When he was formulating the theological expressions of the post-Reformational church in England, he realized that the old way—which, of course, remains the…

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    The Celebration Department

    The Celebration Department

    I want to be clear about something from the very start: I adore my cell phone. From the very first time I found myself in the grocery store, not knowing if my wife wanted tuna fish packed in water or in oil and I was actually able to call and find out, I was in love. I like social media, being able to keep up with my friends…GPS maps…weather prediction…google at my fingertips…it’s all incredible. I do admit, though, to a certain disturbing compulsion with the phone. Whenever there’s a moment in which nothing else is going on, I feel…

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    Happy Independence Day: You're Not Free

    Happy Independence Day: You’re Not Free

    When, in the course of human events, it become necessary for one people to dissolve the political bonds which have connected them with one another…wait, that sounds familiar. Has someone said that before?

    Those, of course, are the first words of the Declaration of Independence, the document that led to the American freedom from Great Britain that we’re celebrating this weekend. That freedom—and really, every freedom—is how we’ve come to define ourselves. We call ourselves “the land of the free,” don’t we? And we’re not alone. Every people longs to be free. From the Second Virginia Convention at St. John’s Church…

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    Be Prepared to Be Unprepared

    Be Prepared to Be Unprepared

    I was a Boy Scout for a while…until I realized that none of the cool kids were Boy Scouts. As soon as I figured out that it wasn’t “cool” to be in the Boy Scouts, I quit to try to jump start my social life. It turned out, of course, that my social problems weren’t the Boy Scouts’ fault. It had more to do with the glasses and the braces and the paralyzing fear of talking to…well, pretty much anyone. Despite my de-connection with the Boy Scouts, the motto pops into my head all the time: “Be prepared.” Recently, I…

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    You Are God's Favorite

    You Are God’s Favorite

    The Bible says that “every good and perfect gift comes from above, from the Father of Lights” (James 1:17). This is a beautiful sentiment. The truth on the ground, though, if you just open your eyes and look around the world, is slightly different. It’s more like “every good and perfect gift comes with a warning.” Every toy my kids get for Christmas has large warnings on the packaging about how this toy—or the plastic bag it comes in—might kill them. Every movie I see warns me about the questionable content it contains. The roller coasters I ride are “not…

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    After God’s Own Heart: Life, Death, and the Gospel in the Story of King David – A Conference Breakout Preview

    It’s one of the most famous lives in the Bible. Chosen by God from seeming obscurity, faced immediately with an obstacle of gigantic proportions (wink wink), and—in the final analysis—a hero and sinner beyond compare, David’s story is a story that can sometimes be hard to relate to. It’s cinematic in its drama and packed with twists and turns…it would be easy to think that David’s life was one-of-a-kind. But it’s not. The stages (if not the gritty details) are lived out again and again by every person who has ever lived. In a powerful way, one of the most famous men in the history of the world is an everyman. David’s story is your story. It’s our story. It’s a story of God’s sovereignty, power, judgment, mercy, and grace.

    At 2:30pm on Friday, April 28th at the 10th annual Mockingbird Conference, I’ll tell this story again. We’ll revisit David’s incredible life (focusing specifically on four watershed moments: his selection as future king, his duel with Goliath, his soap opera with Bathsheba and Uriah, and his final Song of Deliverance) and discuss how God’s interactions with David can help us understand his interactions with us. How does God make choices? How does he stand up for his people when they are in trouble? How does he deal with broken sinners? These questions and more find their answers in the life and rule of King David.

    David was called something that we’d all like to be called: “a man after God’s own heart.” His story gives us better news: God is after us. Come hear the story in a fresh way later this month. I’m looking forward to being with you all in New York City!

    Register for the 10th annual Mockingbird conference here!