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About Joe Nooft

Joe graduated from the University of Central Florida with a bachelor's degree in interpersonal, organizational communications and a minor in cinema studies. He is currently the campus director for a college ministry in Jacksonville, Fl and a firm believer that we're "going to need a bigger boat." You can follow his thoughts on twitter: @joenooft

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    The Top Ten Films of 2017

    The Top Ten Films of 2017

    2017 was a great year in film. For more, check out our abbreviated wrap-up (Seven Films from 2017).

    As the year comes to a close, let’s limp across the finish line together while reminiscing about the best that 2017 had to offer up to the silver screen! It was another big year for reboots and sequels. We were gifted additional installments in the Star Wars, Blade Runner, The Planet of the Apes and Fast and Furious franchises. Marvel continued to appease the masses’ appetites for men in tights, landing four films on the year’s top 15 highest grossing films list. Independent,…

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    The Top Ten Films of 2016

    The Top Ten Films of 2016

    Listen, 2016 has been…difficult. From political turmoil to national racial unrest, and the deaths of many beloved pop-icons such as Bowie, Prince, and, most recently, one of the more daring heroines the cine-verse has ever known, Carrie Fisher. But, as Sarah Condon so gracefully pointed out, 2016 wasn’t the worst year ever. As both the enthusiastic cinephile and the average moviegoer can attest, 2016 provided an admirable follow-up to an excellent year of film in 2015. Listed below are the ten best films that I saw in 2016. With a variety of genres and production levels represented, there is truly something for everyone! I hope you enjoy,…

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    The Top Ten Films of 2015

    The Top Ten Films of 2015

    2015 has produced the most balanced mixture of high quality blockbusters and enraptured indie films that I can remember in recent years. In forfeiting control of some of its biggest franchises to more capable auteurs, Hollywood saw the successful resurgence of some of its most popular franchises with Creed, Jurassic World, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. The smaller market also produced plenty of memorable pictures, and witnessed the transformation of one of its zeniths into a major silver screen production in Mad Max: Fury Road. In both the indie and mainstream movie-verse, filmmakers invited their leading ladies to take…

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    Mining Netflix: Masculinity Surrenders to a Force Majeure

    Mining Netflix: Masculinity Surrenders to a Force Majeure

    Nearly a year ago, NPR released an article entitled The New American Man Doesn’t Look Like His Father where they examined the shift in American masculinity over the past fifty years. There were, of course, both positive and negative findings. For example, postmodern boys and young men have an increased respect for gender equality, but they also are far more likely to dropout of college or choose not to attend at all. A far more alarming, but not entirely surprising, section in the write-up comes in a quote from Stony Brook University sociologist and director of the Center for the Study of…

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    Mining Netflix: Vulnerability on Notting Hill

    Mining Netflix: Vulnerability on Notting Hill

    There’s this girl. She’s someone who can’t be mine, and uh… it’s as if I’ve taken love heroin and I can’t ever have it again. I’ve opened Pandora’s Box and there’s trouble inside.

    If Hugh Grant vowed to collaborate exclusively with writer Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Love Actually) for the rest of his career, the rom-com world would perhaps recover the stability it has sought for the better part of the past decade and a half. Curtis’ ability to present the humorous ills of love with allegorical excellence, marries splendidly with Hugh’s boyish but bold delivery of lines….

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    Ethan Hawke on Acting Out the Death of Self

    Ethan Hawke on Acting Out the Death of Self

    The tenable success of independent films in an industry dominated by major Hollywood productions has become a hot topic as the 87th Academy Awards make their approach. The pulse of this conversation exists entirely because of two names: Wes Anderson and Richard Linklater. With six Oscar nominations between the two of them just this year, and eleven all time, Anderson and Linklater have become the godfathers of the indie family, maturing the clan into planet Hollywood’s lunar necessity.

    The praise is proper, but not necessarily sought; at least not in the same way that, say, George Lucas sought success after 1977. Setting up…

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    An Exhausted Prayer: Get Me Out of {Into} the Woods

    An Exhausted Prayer: Get Me Out of {Into} the Woods

    One less-than-magical night, not so long ago, while afflicted by a monstrous spell of boredom cast upon me by the solitary confinement of the common cold, I ventured, alone, Into the Woods. Why not? I had a gift card… Honestly, as much as I jest, I wanted to see the cluster-cuss of historic fairy tales on the big screen, even though it meant sitting through over 2 hours of sing-a-long Disney tunes (…alright, I liked those too). It was electrifying; an out-of-the-blue good time; like seeing the neo-Gothic steeples of Cinderella’s Orlando castle in person for the first time all over again. More outstanding was the…

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    Top Ten Films of 2014, Pt. 2: Nos. 5-1

    Top Ten Films of 2014, Pt. 2: Nos. 5-1

    Yesterday, we revealed the bottom half of the best ten films of 2014, according to me. I’ll skip the pleasantries and jump right in. Here are my top five films of 2014.

    5. Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

    Lots of dollying, panning, and surface fade to reveal shots create the illusion that Alejandro Iñárritu’s Birdman was filmed in one, long continuous take. Which is not true. Howbeit, the film is made up of many continuous one shot scenes, sometimes lasting up to ten minutes long, and it’s all done, essentially, at one location. That’s tough to do. Not a lot of directors can do it, or do…

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    Top Ten Films of 2014, Pt.1: Nos. 10-6

    Top Ten Films of 2014, Pt.1: Nos. 10-6

    Simply put, which is the best way to put it, 2014 was a pleasing year for the avid movie-goer. Now that it’s nearing its end, I thought it fitting to give the Mockingbird reader a list of personal favorites in a two-part top ten list. Disclaimer: Alas, I am not yet a member of the Academy. I do not get the year’s best films delivered to my doorstep free of charge. I will admit, there are many (presumably) good films that I have just have not seen yet, because, well, movies cost money. But here are the bottom five of Joe Nooft’s personal, paid for, top…

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    The Shelf Life of Athletic Grace

    The Shelf Life of Athletic Grace

    The Los Angeles Lakers get what they want. Period. Numerous franchises have flared up throughout NBA history in a prestigious Cinderella-like supernova only to, just as quickly, burn out. Since moving to the City of Angels from Minnesota, the Lakers have certainly been one of the association’s few spoiled evil stepsisters. As an Orlando Magic Fan, I abhor the Los Angeles Lakers above all other franchises for reasons that are obvious to any medial NBA fan (the Shaq embezzlement of ’96, dismantling us in the 2009 finals, and repeating history in 2013 when they yanked Dwight Howard away from…

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    Mining Netflix:  Hook, And a (Final) Farewell to Robin Williams

    Mining Netflix: Hook, And a (Final) Farewell to Robin Williams

    As suggested in previous articles, I’d encourage you to pull up the film’s soundtrack on Spotify and listen while you read. Listen especially to the song entitled Remembering Childhood. It’s okay to cry.

    There is a temptation, encased in sincere sentiment, to claim the work of Robin Williams for the sake of my generation. The kid film portfolio of the 1990’s, a ray of sunshine in film history that Williams often basked in, mentored me, and taught me that it was not only possible but probable for comedy and drama and pain and suffering to gracefully coexist (I wrote about this…

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    The Messy Truth of the Axe Effect

    The Messy Truth of the Axe Effect

    Before the early 2000’s, the mention of the word “axe” conjured up visions of heavily bearded, weapon wielding men; men who were cloaked in bright red, pre-hipsterdom flannel, the kind of flannel that a man could wear while walking through a forest of ten foot tall thorn bushes and come out unscathed. Maybe hearing the word would even force out an occasional banshee like “TIMBER!” scream. But now, the word axe, attacks a different sense. It brings back the toxic smells of an overly fumigated high school boy’s locker room. Or, if you are a girl, the scent of that…

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